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Hello all,

Good to meet you all, I am new here but have owned my Outlander a year now.

Its a 2010 2.3 4n14 Outlander with 80k on the clock.

When I purchased it, I had it serviced straight away locally (none Mitsubishi dealer) and after a couple of weeks it was blowing a bit of smoke, so took it too a garage who said change the oil and see how it is.

When looking at the oil, it was way over filled. I dropped the oil, refilled with a quality oil and all was well.

A few weeks later I checked the oil level and it was way over filled again.

After a google, it looked like this was a regeneration issue with the DPF - so drove it around for a while hoping for it to regenerate - I am not sure if it did or not.

Now I keep changing the oil, hoping for this to go away, it hasn't.

Today I spoke to the dealer, who told me it's the computer that is putting diesel into the oil to help the regeneration, the only way this can stop is if I have the car serviced with them. Not only are they a fair drive away, they are £250 for a basic value service. I much prefer to service cars myself, I know exactly what has gone into them then.

They have told me unless I can find an independent specialist to do the reset, there is no way around this and it will keep doing it.

They would not do it without doing the service.

So I am asking, has anyone else had this, is this correct, and is there any way around it?

Kind regards
Rob
 

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Hello all,

Good to meet you all, I am new here but have owned my Outlander a year now.

Its a 2010 2.3 4n14 Outlander with 80k on the clock.

When I purchased it, I had it serviced straight away locally (none Mitsubishi dealer) and after a couple of weeks it was blowing a bit of smoke, so took it too a garage who said change the oil and see how it is.

When looking at the oil, it was way over filled. I dropped the oil, refilled with a quality oil and all was well.

A few weeks later I checked the oil level and it was way over filled again.

After a google, it looked like this was a regeneration issue with the DPF - so drove it around for a while hoping for it to regenerate - I am not sure if it did or not.

Now I keep changing the oil, hoping for this to go away, it hasn't.

Today I spoke to the dealer, who told me it's the computer that is putting diesel into the oil to help the regeneration, the only way this can stop is if I have the car serviced with them. Not only are they a fair drive away, they are £250 for a basic value service. I much prefer to service cars myself, I know exactly what has gone into them then.

They have told me unless I can find an independent specialist to do the reset, there is no way around this and it will keep doing it.

They would not do it without doing the service.

So I am asking, has anyone else had this, is this correct, and is there any way around it?

Kind regards
Rob
Hello,

I have the very same problem with my 2011 outlander. I am changing oil like every 1000 miles.
I have serviced with dealers (3 of them) and none could solve this problem.
I have even done the diagnostics check and then they said it would need further tests which would cost about £500
I am speaking to their HO customer service.
But no joy so far.
I am thinking of moving legally, as the car should give warning whether it is a DPF related issue or not.
 

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Hi.
I have a 2012 Outlander 2.2 diesel and have exactly the same problem. I believe the system puts an amount of oil into the engine to burn the dpf. However, if it is interrupted it goes to the sump. Hence the "X" on the dip stick to indicate an oil change is required.

Does this mean diesel is added every journey? We have had to change the oil twice in 1 year and only done 10k miles. If I knew this I would not have bought the car.

The DPF light has never come on and we are unable to remove cancel the "check engine oil level" light on the dash after a service.

Has anyone resolved this issue?
 

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The diesel gets injected to start and keep the DPF regenerating when it needs to. If it is sucessful, the fuel is burnt with no problems, but if the car is unable to complete its burn, or is trying to burn and there is another reason it cannot, then it will be added to the sump and the oils counter in the cars engine computer will increase.

When the car is serviced, the tech must reset this oil counter. And he should know what to look for depending on the reading. or instance if it reads 1500cc, he should know to look for an issue.

A car that is doing enough long journeys and has no problems will have a count of 0cc - 100cc.
Anything up to 600cc is ok with no action needed.

Do you only do very short journeys? This could be a factor.

Is it a dealer doing your service? or a general sevice centre?
 

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Hi thanks for the reply.
Typically 1 short journey daily Mon to Friday and 2 X 80 milers on the weekend to the lakes and back.

It's serviced locally not by mitsubishi and we can not reset the "check oil level indicator."

Do you know if it only injects if the dpf needs to be cleaned or does it inject on every startup /journey (As if it does it would suggest the car can not be used for short journeys)

Thanks again.
 

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Only when it needs to be cleaned. I would suggest the 80 milers would generally take care of the DPF.

Most Small garages have access to a scan tool these days. And a lot of them can reset the oil counter. Big problem is the wording Mitsubishi use.

On The MUT dealer tool this function is in...
Engine / Special function / initialisation / exchange engine oil service

And i have used a snap on scan tool to do this function, this wording is slightly different.

From memory though.... the oil level indicator might be being triggered by a fault code. P252F is high oil level.

On another thought. Get your garage to check the inlet manifold for carbon build up. At the front of the manifold is a small rubber pipe going to the boost pressure sensor. Soot can build up around this small brass pipe on the manifold and blocks or restricts the air flow to the sensor. This will send the system crazy and cause the DPF not to work correctly and oil level will increase.
 
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